Maternal anthropometry and pregnancy outcome among Jerusalem women

E. Villamor, R. Gofin, B. Adler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Maternal anthropometry, expressed in terms of height, prepregnancy weight and weight gain during pregnancy was studied in 432 Israeli mothers who attended routinely the Hadassah Community Health Centre in Jerusalem, and delivered live births from 1990 to 1994. Among the variables studied, social class was positively associated to mother's height. From five curves fitted with gestational age and weight gain of each woman, a quadratic one was chosen to describe the weight gain pattern of the population. From the model, prepregnancy weight and the weekly rate of weight gain were calculated. Height was positively associated to the rate of weight gain. Gestational age at delivery and gender were the strongest predictors of birth weight, followed by height and rate of weight gain. Three patterns of weight gain were observed: concave, linear and convex. No one of the variables studied was related to the pattern of weight gain as determinant or consequence. Since not all the patterns follow the same shape, the interpretation of adequacy of weight gain at a certain gestational age by using available standards must be done carefully until further studies clarify the relationships between patterns of weight gain and pregnancy outcomes for this population. Prospective studies should be carried out in Israel to control for several factors influencing maternal anthropometry and pregnancy outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-343
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Human Biology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Physiology
  • Aging
  • Genetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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