Meeting science meets public health: Results from the “Stress and Violence in fire-based EMS Responders (SAVER)” Systems Checklist Consensus Conference (SC3)

Regan M. Murray, Joseph A. Allen, Andrea L. Davis, Jennifer A. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: In order to implement a systems-level Emergency Medical Services (EMS) workplace violence intervention, input from end users was critically needed. We convened the two-day Stress and Violence in fire-based EMS Responders (SAVER)” Systems Checklist Consensus Conference (SC3) using methods from meeting science (i.e., ThinkLets) to comprehensively and efficiently gather feedback from stakeholders on the completeness and utility of the draft checklist that would comprise the intervention. Methods: ThinkLets, a codified facilitation technique was used to aid brainstorming, convergence, organization, evaluation, and consensus building activities on the SAVER Systems Checklist among 41 national stakeholders during a two-day conference. A qualitative and quantitative process evaluation was conducted to measure the effectiveness of conference procedures. To verify checklist feasibility results from the conference, a second feasibility assessment was conducted with the four implementation sites. Conclusions: The quantitative conference evaluation results indicated most participants viewed the conference process favorably. Emergent themes reflecting on conference effectiveness and suggestions for improvements are described. The re-evaluation of the checklist's feasibility completed by the SAVER study sites confirmed prior feasibility findings. SAVER study sites cast 45.5% of votes on checklist items to be most feasible, 34.9% as less feasible, and 19.6% as extremely difficult. Practical Applications: Multidisciplinary collaboration between public health, occupational health psychology, and meeting science led to the development of the SAVER Systems Checklist. The checklist underscores important needs for EMS policy and training development critical to responder safety as identified and supported by over 41 diverse subject matter experts. The incorporation of a widely used meeting science method, ThinkLets, into public health intervention design proved an effective and well-received approach to bring assessment, evaluation, and consensus to the SAVER Systems Checklist. These methods may hold benefit for other industries and disciplines that may not be familiar with such facilitation and consensus-building techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-261
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Safety Research
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
  • Intervention
  • SAVER Systems Checklist
  • ThinkLets
  • Workplace violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

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