Methamphetamine increases brain viral load and activates natural killer cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys

Maria Cecilia Garibaldi Marcondes, Claudia Flynn, Debbie D. Watry, Michelle Zandonatti, Howard S. Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse increases risky behaviors that contribute to the spread of HIV infection. In addition, because HIV and Meth independently affect physiological systems including the central nervous system, HIV-induced disease may be more severe in drug users. We investigated changes in blood and brain viral load as well as differences in immune cells in chronically simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques that were either administered Meth or used as controls. Although Meth administration did not alter levels of virus in the plasma, viral load in the brain was significantly increased in Meth-treated animals compared with control animals. Meth treatment also resulted in an activation of natural killer cells. Given the prevalence of Meth use in HIV-infected and HIV at-risk populations, these findings reveal the likely untoward effects of Meth abuse in such individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-361
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume177
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Methamphetamine increases brain viral load and activates natural killer cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this