Minimally invasive, benign foregut surgery is not associated with long-term, persistent opioid use postoperatively: an analysis of the IBM® MarketScan® database

Ivy N. Haskins, Emilie D. Duchesneau, Chris B. Agala, Stephanie T. Lumpkin, Paula D. Strassle, Timothy M. Farrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: It is unknown if opioid naïve patients who undergo minimally invasive, benign foregut operations are at risk for progressing to persistent postoperative opioid use. The purpose of our study was to determine if opioid naïve patients who undergo minimally invasive, benign foregut operations progress to persistent postoperative opioid use and to identify any patient- and surgery-specific factors associated with persistent postoperative opioid use. Methods: Opioid-naïve, adult patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication, hiatal hernia repair, or Heller myotomy from 2010 to 2018 were identified within the IBM® MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters Database. Daily drug logs of the preoperative and postoperative period were evaluated to assess for changes in drug use patters. The primary outcome of interest was persistent postoperative opioid use, defined as at least 33% of the proportion of days covered by opioid prescriptions at 365-day follow-up. Patient demographic information and clinical risk factors for persistent postoperative opioid use at 365 days postoperatively were estimated using log-binomial regression. Results: A total of 17,530 patients met inclusion criteria; 6895 underwent fundoplication, 9235 underwent hiatal hernia repair, and 1400 underwent Heller myotomy. 9652 patients had at least one opioid prescription filled in the perioperative period. Sixty-five patients (0.4%) were found to have persistent postoperative opioid use at 365 days postoperatively. Lower Charlson comorbidity index scores and a history of mental illness or substance use disorder had a statistically but not clinically significant protective effect on the risk of persistent postoperative opioid use at 365 days postoperatively. Conclusions: Only half of opioid naïve patients undergoing minimally invasive, benign foregut operations filled an opioid prescription postoperatively. The risk of progression to persistent postoperative opioid use was less than 1%. These findings support the current guidelines that limit the number of opioid pills prescribed following general surgery operations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSurgical endoscopy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Foregut surgery
  • Fundoplication
  • Heller myotomy
  • Hiatal hernia
  • Opioid abuse
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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