Modifications in acute phase and complement systems predict shifts in cognitive status of HIV-infected patients

Ceereena Ubaida-Mohien, Benjamin Lamberty, Alex M. Dickens, Michelle M. Mielke, Thomas Marcotte, Ned Sacktor, Igor Grant, Scott Letendre, Donald Franklin, Pawel Cibrowski, Ravi Tharakan, Justin C. McArthur, Howard Fox, Norman J. Haughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) has not changed considerably in the last two decades. Potent antiretroviral therapy has shifted the severity of HAND to milder phenotypes, but excess morbidity and mortality continue to be associated with HAND. Changes in numerous markers of immune function, inflammation, and cellular stress have been repeatedly associated with HAND, but the underlying systems that drive these changes have not been identified. Method: In this study, we used systems informatics to interrogate the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic content of longitudinal samples obtained from HIV-infected adults with stably unimpaired, stably impaired, worsening, or improving neurocognitive performance. Results and conclusion: The patterns of change in cerebrospinal fluid protein content implicated the induction of acute phase and complement systems as important regulators of neurocognitive status. Worsening neurocognitive performance was preceded by induction of acute phase and complement systems, whereas improving neurocognitive performance was preceded by a downregulation of these systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1365-1378
Number of pages14
JournalAIDS
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 2017

Keywords

  • HIV
  • HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders
  • biomarker
  • cerebrospinal fluid
  • neurological impairment
  • proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Ubaida-Mohien, C., Lamberty, B., Dickens, A. M., Mielke, M. M., Marcotte, T., Sacktor, N., Grant, I., Letendre, S., Franklin, D., Cibrowski, P., Tharakan, R., McArthur, J. C., Fox, H., & Haughey, N. J. (2017). Modifications in acute phase and complement systems predict shifts in cognitive status of HIV-infected patients. AIDS, 31(10), 1365-1378. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000001503