Mononuclear phagocyte biophysiology influences brain transendothelial and tissue migration: Implication for HIV-1-associated dementia

Induk Chung, Marina Zelivyanskaya, Howard E. Gendelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mononuclear phagocyte (MP) brain migration influence neuronal damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). We demonstrate that potassium channels, expressed in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), are vital for MP movement through Boyden chemotactic chambers, an artificial blood-brain barrier and organotypic hippocampal brain slices. MDM migration is inhibited by voltage-and calcium-activated potassium channel blockers that include charybodotoxin, margatoxin, agatoxin and apamin. This is observed both in uninfected and HIV-1-infected MP. The results suggest that potassium channels affect MDM brain migration through altering cell volume and shape. Such mechanisms likely affect MP-induced neuronal destruction during HAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-54
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume122
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Cell migration
  • Charybodotoxin
  • Confocal microscopy
  • HIV-infected monocyte
  • K channel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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