Morphometric and morphologic evaluations in stage III non‐small cell lung cancers. Prognostic significance of quantitative assessment of infiltrating lymphoid cells

Tung‐Kwang ‐K Lee, Ronnie D. Horner, Jan F. Silverman, Yue‐Han ‐H Chen, Claire Jenny, Charles W. Scarantino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluated data from 30 non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine whether demographic, clinical, and morphologic and morphometric data that were obtained prior to treatment, could be used to predict survival. All patients had Stage III disease, and all subsequently were treated identically with concurrent radiotherapy, cisplatin, and 5‐fluorouracil. The series consisted of 18 squamous carcinomas, eight adenocarcinomas, and four large cell carcinomas. Morphometric measurements of randomized selected cancer cells per case included diameter of cytoplasm, nuclei, and nucleoli. Morphologic parameters evaluated were mitotic index, histologic differentiation, and pattern of nuclear chromatin of cancer cells, and the degree of necrosis and fibrosis of tumor tissue. The lymphoid and neutrophil index defined as the ratio of lymphoid cells and neutrophils to cancer cells from randomized microscopic fields (median = 25) at 400X magnification were also determined. Our study indicated that the peritumor lymphoid index was the only factor significantly associated with the length of survival. The correlation coefficient (Pearson r) of these two factors was 0.5 (P < 0.005). The median survival time of patients with peritumor lymphoid index <3 and ≥3 was 95 days and 376 days, respectively (Kaplan‐Meier estimation). The peritumor lymphoid index was an independent prognosticator of clinical outcome of Stage III NSCLC patients, and did not correlate with any of the other parameters analyzed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-316
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Morphometric and morphologic evaluations in stage III non‐small cell lung cancers. Prognostic significance of quantitative assessment of infiltrating lymphoid cells'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this