Multiple procedures in the initial surgical setting: When do the benefits outweigh the risks in patients with multiple system trauma?

Benjamin R. Childs, Nickolas J. Nahm, Timothy A. Moore, Heather A. Vallier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To compare single versus multiple procedures in the same surgical setting. We hypothesized that complication rates would not be different and length of stay would be shorter in patients undergoing multiple procedures. Design: Prospective, cohort. Setting: Level 1 trauma center. Patients/Participants: A total of 370 patients with high-energy fractures were treated after a standard protocol for resuscitation to lactate <4.0 mmol/L, pH ≥7.25, or base excess (BE) ≥-5.5 mmol/L. Fractures included femur (n 167), pelvis (n 74), acetabulum (n 54), and spine (n 107). Main Outcome Measurements: Complications, including pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, infections, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, multiple organ failure, and death, and length of stay. Results: Definitive fixation was performed concurrently with another procedure in 147 patients. They had greater ISS (29.4 vs. 24.6, P < 0.01), more transfusions (8.9 U vs. 3.6 U, P < 0.01), and longer surgery (4:22 vs. 2:41, P < 0.01) than patients with fracture fixation only, but no differences in complications. When patients who had definitive fixation in the same setting as another procedure were compared only with other patients who required more than 1 procedure performed in a staged manner on different days (n 71), complications were fewer (33% vs. 54%, P 0.004), and ventilation time (4.00 vs. 6.83 days), intensive care unit (ICU) stay (6.38 vs. 10.6 days), and length of stay (12.4 vs. 16.0 days) were shorter (all P ≤ 0.03) for the nonstaged patients. Conclusions: In resuscitated patients, definitive fixation in the same setting as another procedure did not increase the frequency of complications despite greater ISS, transfusions, and surgical duration in the multiple procedure group. Multiple procedures in the same setting may reduce complications and hospital stay versus additional surgeries on other days. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-425
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • complication
  • femur fracture
  • multiple trauma
  • resuscitation
  • spine fracture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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