Narrative review: Do state laws make it easier to say "i'm sorry?"

William M. McDonnell, Elisabeth Guenther

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Initiatives intended to reduce the frequency and impact of medical errors generally rely on recognition and disclosure of medical errors. However, fear of malpractice liability is a barrier to physician disclosure. Some U.S. state legislatures have attempted to encourage physicians to disclose medical errors by enacting "apology laws." The authors reviewed the codified statutes of each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia to determine the prevalence and characteristics of such apology laws. They found that many states have recently adopted apology laws and that there is variability in these laws. The authors review some of the important differences in these laws and explore the potential impact of apology laws.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)811-815
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of internal medicine
Volume149
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Narrative review: Do state laws make it easier to say "i'm sorry?"'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this