Neurophysiological abnormalities in the sensorimotor cortices during the motor planning and movement execution stages of children with cerebral palsy

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38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: This investigation used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory responses of the sensorimotor cortices during the motor planning and movement execution stages of children with typical development and children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: The study involved 13 children with CP (nine males, four females; mean [SD] age 14y 3mo [9mo], range 10-18y; height 1.61m [0.08m]; weight 52.65kg [13kg]), and 13 age- and sex-matched typically developing children (height 1.64m [0.06m]; weight 56.88kg [10kg]). The experiment required the children to extend their knee joint as whole-head MEG recordings were acquired. Beamformer imaging methods were employed to quantify the source activity of the beta-frequency (14-28Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) that occurs during the motor planning period, and the gamma-frequency (~50Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) that occurs at the motor execution stage. Results: The children with CP had a stronger mean beta ERD during the motor planning phase and reduced mean gamma ERS at the onset of movement. Interpretation: The uncharacteristic beta ERD in the children with CP suggests that they may have greater difficulty planning knee joint movements. We suggest that these aberrant beta ERD oscillations may have a cascading effect on the gamma ERS, which ultimately affects the execution of the motor command. What this paper adds: Children with CP have uncharacteristic beta event-related desynchronization during the motor planning period.The sensorimotor cortices have difficulty computing the proper motor output.Children with CP have weaker gamma event-related synchronization during motor execution. The sensorimotor cortices have difficulty executing the motor plan.Improving the motor planning stage may improve the final motor performance. This article is commented on by Valvano on pages 1035-1036 of this issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1072-1077
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume56
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

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