Novel methods to extract and quantify sensors based on single wall carbon nanotube fluorescence from animal tissue and hydrogel-based platforms

Eric Hofferber, Jakob Meier, Nicolas Herrera, Joseph Stapleton, Kayla Ney, Becca Francis, Chris Calkins, Nicole Iverson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sensors that can quickly and accurately diagnose and monitor human health are currently at the forefront of medical research. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based optical biosensors are a growing area of research due to the high spatiotemporal resolution of their near infrared fluorescence leading to high tissue transparency and unparalleled sensitivity to analytes of interest. Unfortunately, due to the functionalization requirements of SWNT-based sensors, there are concerns surrounding accumulation and persistence when applied in vivo. In this study, we developed protocols to extract and quantify SWNT from complex solutions and show an 89% sensor retention by hydrogel platforms when implanted in vivo. Animal tissues of interest were also extracted and probed for SWNT content showing no accumulation (0.03 mg l-1 SWNT detection limit). The methods developed in this paper demonstrated one avenue for applying SWNT sensors in vivo without concern for accumulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number025005
JournalMethods and Applications in Fluorescence
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • carbon nanotubes
  • in vivo
  • large animal imaging
  • sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Spectroscopy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Novel methods to extract and quantify sensors based on single wall carbon nanotube fluorescence from animal tissue and hydrogel-based platforms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this