Optimizing agronomic practices for hard winter wheat production in the Great Plains with respect to seeding rate, row spacing, and variety

Maria C.M. Sciencia, Cody F. Creech, Katherine A. Frels, Amanda C. Easterly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yield in dryland areas is optimized by the improvement of genetics in combination with ideal production practices. Different combinations of seeding rate and row spacing can influence the development of wheat plants, impacting wheat yield and its components. To determine the influence of these practices, yield components, water use efficiency (WUE), biomass, and subsequent grain yield were evaluated in an experiment conducted at the High Plains Agricultural Laboratory, Sidney, NE, from 2019 until 2022, using a split-plot randomized complete block design with four replications. Treatments consisted of four different row spacings (19, 25, 31, and 51 cm), three seeding rates (1.05, 2.1, and 3.1 million seeds ha−1), and two high performing winter wheat varieties—‘Ruth’ and ‘Robidoux’. Row spacing showed differences in wheat yield (p < 0.0001) across all years, with a significant effect of seeding rate only in 1 year and an interaction effect of the three factors in 2022 alone. Higher wheat yield was achieved with the two narrower row spacings (19 and 25 cm) compared to the wider row spacings of 38 and 51 cm. The treatment combining the 19 cm row spacing and either 2.1 or 3.1 million seed ha−1 seeding rate had the greatest yields in most years. Narrower row spacings had improved WUE in drier years as compared to wider row spacings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2964-2978
Number of pages15
JournalAgronomy Journal
Volume115
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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