Outcomes associated with lower doses of ketamine by emergency medical services for profound agitation

Shaila K. Coffey, J. Priyanka Vakkalanka, Haley Egan, Kelli Wallace, Karisa K. Harland, Nicholas M. Mohr, Azeemuddin Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Ketamine is commonly used to treat profound agitation in the prehospital setting. Early in ketamine's prehospital use, intubation after arrival in the emergency department (ED) was frequent. We sought to measure the frequency of ED intubation at a Midwest academic medical center after prehospital ketamine use for profound agitation, hypothesizing that intubation has become less frequent as prehospital ketamine has become more common and prehospital dosing has improved. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients receiving ketamine in the prehospital setting for profound agitation and transported to a midwestern, 60,000-visit, Level 1 trauma center between January 1, 2017- March 1, 2021. We report descriptive analyses of patient-level prehospital clinical data and ED outcomes. The primary outcome was proportion of patients intubated in the ED. Results: A total of 78 patients received ketamine in the prehospital setting (69% male, mean age 36 years). Of the 42 (54%) admitted patients, 15 (36% of admissions) were admissions to the intensive care unit. Overall, 12% (95% confidence interval [CI]), 4.5-18.6%)] of patients were intubated, and indications included agitation (n = 4), airway protection not otherwise specified (n = 4), and respiratory failure (n = 1). Conclusion: Endotracheal intubation in the ED after prehospital ketamine use for profound agitation in our study sample was found to be less than previously reported.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1183-1189
Number of pages7
JournalWestern Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

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