Pain control after cesarean birth. Efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia vs traditional therapy (IM morphine).

R. Perez-Woods, J. C. Grohar, M. Skaredoff, S. G. Rock, A. M. Tse, P. Tomich, S. Polich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

A clinical trial compared the efficacy of a mechanical device to deliver patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) (n = 25) with intramuscularly administered morphine (n = 17) for postcesarean pain management. Hypotheses were: (1) patient-controlled administration of narcotics will be superior (increased satisfaction, reduced pain, decreased sedation, increased ambulation, decreased length of stay), and (2) functional vital capacity will increase post-operatively with PCA. No differences in demographic variables were identified (P = less than or equal to .001). Differences in satisfaction (greater in PCA group, P = less than or equal to .05), ambulation (greater in PCA group, P = less than or equal to .001), amount of medication used (greater in PCA group, P = less than or equal to .001), and sedation level (less in PCA group, P = less than or equal to .05) were identified. No differences in vital capacity were identified. The hypothesis related to the superiority of PCA was accepted, while the association between PCA and increased vital capacity was not supported. The use of mechanical PCA devices provides an effective and safe means of managing postcesarean pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-181
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of perinatology : official journal of the California Perinatal Association
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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