Parental depression and diabetes-specific distress after the onset of type 1 diabetes in children

Amy E. Noser, Hongying Dai, Arwen M. Marker, Jennifer K. Raymond, Shideh Majidi, Mark A. Clements, Kelly R. Stanek, Susana R. Patton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine trajectories of two types of type 1 diabetes (T1D) specific distress (i.e., daily T1D management and worries about the future and long-term complications) and the moderating role of parental depression in parents of children newly diagnosed with T1D. Method: A total of 126 families of 5- to 9-year-olds with new-onset T1D enrolled in the study. One-hundred twenty-five families completed study measures at baseline, 102 at 6-month follow-up, and 89 at 12-month follow-up. Parents completed measures of depression and T1D-specific distress concerning daily T1D management and worries about the future and long-term complications at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. We used multilevel modeling to examine 12-month trajectories of daily and long-term T1D-specific distress and to examine if parental depression modified these trajectories. Results: Results showed a significant reduction in daily T1D-specific distress from baseline to 6-month follow-up and maintenance of daily T1D-specific distress from 6- to 12-month follow-up. The significant interaction of baseline parental depression and time indicated that parents with depressive symptoms had a smaller reduction in daily T1D-specific distress from baseline to 6-month follow-up compared to parents without depressive symptoms. Findings for long-term T1D-specific distress indicated that parents with depressive symptoms reported higher distress across all assessment points, with peak long-term T1D-specific distress for parents with depressive symptoms occurring at 6-month follow-up. Conclusion: Many parents experienced significant T1D-specific distress for a period of time following their child's initial diagnosis and this distress appears to be exacerbated by parental depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-112
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • Type 1 diabetes
  • depression
  • distress
  • new-onset
  • parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Noser, A. E., Dai, H., Marker, A. M., Raymond, J. K., Majidi, S., Clements, M. A., Stanek, K. R., & Patton, S. R. (2019). Parental depression and diabetes-specific distress after the onset of type 1 diabetes in children. Health Psychology, 38(2), 103-112. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000699