Parental restrictive mediation and children's violent video game play: The effectiveness of the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) Rating system

Russell N. Laczniak, Les Carlson, Doug Walker, E. Deanne Brocato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study seeks to determine whether Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) ratings are an effective tool for parents seeking to enhance their mediation efforts and ultimately reduce their children's play of violent video games (and their children's corresponding engagement in negative behaviors, such as getting in fights at school). Results demonstrate that children of parents who employ restrictive mediation efforts tend to play less violent video games, and the effect of these efforts is enhanced when parents use the ESRB system. This moderated effect also extends to reduce children's engagement in negative behaviors in school. These findings suggest that both the video game industry and the government could play a role in establishing and maintaining educational programs whose purpose is to inform parents/caretakers about the potential usefulness of the ESRB guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-78
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Public Policy and Marketing
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Keywords

  • Children
  • Esrb ratings
  • Parental mediation
  • Violent video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

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