Patterns and Correlates of Personal, Family, and Prior Placement Variables in an Interagency Community Based System of Care

Douglas Cullinan, Michael H. Epstein, Kevin P. Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined interrelationships among personal, family, and prior service utilization data collected on young people selected to participate in a Chicago suburban area system of care, with a detailed consideration of a subset of 176 White participants aged 9-20 years. Data obtained through a review of archival information and then analyzed included WISC IQ grade retention, medication status, DSM diagnostic group, adjudication, marital status of parents, living situation before selection, maternal employment, public assistance status, family risk status, and placement history. Results showed that IQ and specific DSM diagnostic category were not important correlates of personal, famify, or placement variables, although having a DSM diagnosis of any kind was. Family risk factors, including family history of mental illness, substance abuse, criminal conviction, and violence in the famify, were related to other famify variables, primarily. Adjudication and prescribed medication appeared to have been alternative responses to these young people's problems. A cluster analysis of these system of care participants' placement histories indicated five dusters characterized by varied personal and famify correlates, as well as different patterns of placement usage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-321
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Correlates
  • Family
  • Personal
  • Prior placement
  • System of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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