Peer Relations Training Moderates Trauma Symptoms and Suicide Ideation for Youth in a Residential Program

Patrick M. Tyler, Dustin S. Hillman, Jay L. Ringle

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Youth in residential programs have high rates of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and suicidality. Although trauma symptoms and suicidality can both be related to peer relationship problems, there is little research on how social skills training on peer relations could help these youth. This study examined if progress made on peer relations training and sex moderated the association between trauma symptoms at intake and suicide ideation incidents while in the program. The sample included archival data on youth placed in a large residential program in the Midwest (N = 1118) ages 12–19 years old (M = 15.97 years, SD = 1.15), of which 62.2% were boys. Results indicated both peer relations training (b = −0.07, SE = 0.02, p = 0.001) and sex (b = −0.04, SE = 0.02, p = 0.032) moderated the relationship between trauma symptoms at intake and suicide ideation incidents in care. The benefits of peer relations training for youth presenting with trauma symptoms and suicide ideations are discussed along with recommendations for further research.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2022

    Keywords

    • Adolescents
    • Peer relations
    • Residential programs
    • Social skills training
    • Suicide
    • Trauma symptoms

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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