Perceptions of Human Security among Islamic School Students, Parents and Teachers in Southern Thailand’s Subnational Conflict Zone

Tarik Abdel-Monem, Mahsoom Sateemae, Suhaimee Sateemae, Sareeha Tayongmat, Stacey J. Hoffman, Mark DeKraai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since 2004, close to 7,000 people have died in Thailand’s domestic insurgency in its three Muslim-majority southern provinces, one of the longest-running, low-intensity conflicts in Southeast Asia. This study assesses perceptions of human security threats in the area among a sample of students, their parents, and teachers of Islamic private schools (n = 427, n = 331, n = 51, respectively), and how they relate to perceptions of government actors and other community institutions. Questionnaire items were drawn from the World Values Survey Wave 6. Focus groups and interviews were also conducted to deepen our understanding of conflict related dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-421
Number of pages43
JournalCivil Wars
Volume22
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Political Science and International Relations

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