Phase I trial of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan i patients with relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma following high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation

Julie M. Vose, Philip J. Bierman, Fausto R. Loberiza, Robert G. Bociek, Daniel Matso, James O. Armitage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Between January 2001 and September 2005, 19 patients with progressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with a cohort-specific dose of yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (0.10-0.20 mCi/kg) to determine appropriate dosing in patients who had previously received high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Patients were required to have adequate end organ function and bone marrow status. Patients had been treated with a median of three prior therapies (range, 1-9). The median time from ASCT to radioimmunotherapy was 28 months. Hematologic toxicities were dose-limiting and included grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia (53%), neutropenia (32%), and anemia (21%). The majority of grade 3-4 events occurred at the 0.2mCi/kg dose level. Nine patients responded (complete response, complete response unconfirmed, or partial response) to the therapy. At a median follow-up of 37 months, the 1-year event-free and overall survival rates were 26% and 57%, respectively. A dose of 0.2 mCi/kg ibritumomab tiuxetan is safe and effective for patients with progressive disease after high-dose chemotherapy and ASCT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-690
Number of pages8
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Autologous stem cell transplantation
  • High-dose chemotherapy
  • Ibritumomab tiuxetan
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Radio immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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