Preventing hospital acquired venous-thromboembolism by utilizing clinical pathway methodology to reduce cognitive errors

J. B. Rousek, A. Polich, C. M. Masek, J. T. Knezevich, G. M. Etherton, M. S. Hallbeck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common and preventable adverse event with hospitalized patients described as being at 100 times greater risk than people in the community. The purpose of this study was to compare the ease-of-use and required cognitive effort during the use of two chemoprophylaxis assessment and assignment protocols to identify the protocol with the highest usability and effectiveness. The two compared protocols consisted of the current risk stratification (protocol R) and a proposed intent-to-treat method (protocol 1). The purpose of the intent-to-treat protocol was to use clinical pathway methodology to reduce the amount of cognitive effort utilized by resident physicians during the treatment of VTE. Forty-one medicine residents participated in an online comparison of the two different protocols (R and 1) for treating VTE prophylaxis using six unique patient scenarios. Statistical analyses found that protocol 1 (52.8 sec.) produced significantly faster mean scenario completion times than protocol R (79.6 sec.) along with significantly (33%) more correct chemoprophylaxis assignment outcomes over all six scenarios and scenario difficulty levels (easy, medium or hard). The results of this study indicate that protocol 1 enhances performance by reducing cognitive errors, completion time and unnecessary protocol steps by using the proposed clinical pathway methodology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010
Pages914-918
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 27 2010Oct 1 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period9/27/1010/1/10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Preventing hospital acquired venous-thromboembolism by utilizing clinical pathway methodology to reduce cognitive errors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this