Primary cilia and ciliary signaling pathways in aging and age-related brain disorders

Rong Ma, Naseer A. Kutchy, Liang Chen, Douglas D. Meigs, Guoku Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Brain disorders are characterized by the progressive loss of structure and function of the brain as a consequence of progressive degeneration and/or death of nerve cells. Aging is a major risk factor for brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and stroke. Various cellular and molecular events have been shown to play a role in the progress of neurodegenerative diseases. Emerging studies suggest that primary cilia could be a key regulator in brain diseases. The primary cilium is a singular cellular organelle expressed on the surface of many cell types, such as astrocytes and neurons in the mature brain. Primary cilia detect extracellular cues, such as Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) protein, and transduce these signals into cells to regulate various signaling pathways. Abnormalities in ciliary length and frequency (ratio of ciliated cells) have been implicated in various human diseases, including brain disorders. This review summarizes current findings and thoughts on the role of primary cilia and ciliary signaling pathways in aging and age-related brain disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105607
JournalNeurobiology of Disease
Volume163
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Hedgehog signaling
  • Notch signaling
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Primary cilia
  • Wnt signaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology

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