Probing striatal function in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A PET study of implicit sequence learning

Scott L. Rauch, Cary R. Savage, Nathaniel M. Alpert, Darin Dougherty, Adair Kendrick, Tim Curran, Halle D. Brown, Peter Manzo, Alan J. Fischman, Michael A. Jenike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

181 Scopus citations

Abstract

Positron emission tomography was employed to contrast the brain activation pattern in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) to that of matched control subjects while they performed an implicit learning task. Although patients and control subjects evidenced comparable learning, imaging data from control subjects indicated bilateral inferior striatal activation, whereas OCD patients did not activate right or left inferior striatum and instead showed bilateral medial temporal activation. The findings further implicate corticostriatal dysfunction in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Furthernore, when OCD patients are confronted with stimuli that call for recruitment of corticostriatal systems, they instead appear to access brain regions normally associated with explicit (conscious) information processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-573
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Rauch, S. L., Savage, C. R., Alpert, N. M., Dougherty, D., Kendrick, A., Curran, T., Brown, H. D., Manzo, P., Fischman, A. J., & Jenike, M. A. (1997). Probing striatal function in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A PET study of implicit sequence learning. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 9(4), 568-573. https://doi.org/10.1176/jnp.9.4.568