Procedural skills of practicing pulmonologists: A national survey of 1,000 members of the American College of Physicians

T. G. Tape, L. L. Blank, R. S. Wigton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

We surveyed pulmonologists to determine which procedures they do in practice, where they learned the procedures, and how much training they recommend to attain and maintain clinical competence in each. We mailed a survey to a random sample of 1,000 members of the American College of Physicians who were identified as practicing pulmonologists; 755 (75%) responded. Respondents performed a variety of pulmonary procedures, an average of 17 of the 29 listed. Pulmonologists who were more recent graduates, who worked longer hours, and who were involved in critical care did a greater variety of procedures. Only 26% of practicing pulmonologists currently do all the procedures required for board certification in pulmonary medicine. For each of 13 specific procedures, the number reported done in the past year was generally unrelated to practice factors. Many respondents who learned procedures in practice did so without formal training or supervision. Respondents' recommendations regarding numbers of procedures required to attain or maintain competence did not vary greatly. Pulmonologists vary considerably in the types of procedures they do. Their opinions about the training needed for competence help to better define requirements for training programs. More attention should be focused on training and certifying practicing pulmonologists in procedures learned after formal fellowship training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-287
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume151
Issue number2 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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