Projected growth in pharmacy education and research, 2010 to 2015

Katherine K. Knapp, Michael Manolakis, Andrew A. Webster, Keith M. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To determine projected growth in pharmacy education and research from 2010 to 2015 and to relate findings to external and internal factors. Methods. An e-mail survey instrument was sent to all US pharmacy deans, and responses were used to estimate growth in the number of first-professional-degree doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) graduates, residents/fellows, graduate students, faculty members, graduate research faculty members, and postdoctoral fellows. Results were related to the national economy, trends in faculty vacancies, growth trends in other health professions, pharmacist roles, and healthcare reform. Results. Five-year growth projections were: 58% increase in the number of residents/fellows, 23% in postdoctoral fellows, 21% in entry-level PharmD graduates, 19% in graduate/research faculty members, 17% in graduate students, and 13% in total pharmacy faculty members. Residencies/fellowships showed the highest projected growth rates (58%). Graduate education and research data suggest a growing research enterprise. Faculty vacancy trends were downward and this suggests better faculty availability in coming years. Conclusions. Substantial growth is expected from 2010 to 2015 in all areas of pharmacy education. External factors and how well the profession is able to demonstrate its contribution to resolving healthcare problems may influence the actual growth rates achieved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume75
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Fellows
  • Graduate students
  • Growth
  • Pharmacy education
  • Pharmacy faculty members
  • Research
  • Residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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