Psychophysical and physiological measures of electrical-field interaction in cochlear implants

Michelle L. Hughes, Lisa J. Stille

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) can be used to predict psychophysical electrical-field interaction patterns obtained with simultaneous stimulation of intracochlear electrodes. The second goal was to determine whether ECAP patterns are affected by recording location because differences might influence the relation between ECAP and psychophysical measures. The third goal was to investigate whether symmetrical threshold shifts are produced with phase inversion of the interaction stimulus. Nine adults with Advanced Bionics cochlear implants participated. ECAP and psychophysical thresholds were obtained for basal, middle, and apical probe electrodes in the presence of a subthreshold interaction stimulus delivered simultaneously to each of seven to eight interaction electrodes per probe. The results showed highly significant correlations between ECAP and psychophysical threshold shifts for all nine subjects, which suggests that the ECAP can adequately predict psychophysical electrical-field interaction patterns for subthreshold stimuli. ECAP thresholds were significantly higher for recordings from the basal (versus apical) side of the probe, which suggests that recording location may affect relations between ECAP and psychophysical measures. Interaction stimulus phase inversion generally produced symmetrical threshold shifts for psychophysical measures but not for half of ECAP measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-260
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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