Psychosocial correlates in bullying and victimization: The relationship between depression, anxiety, and bully/victim status

Susan M. Swearer, Samuel Y. Song, Paulette Tam Cary, John W. Eagle, William T. Mickelson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examined differences between bullies, victims, and bully-victims on internalizing psychopathology (depression and anxiety), Participants included 133 (66 male and 67 female) sixth-grade students from a Midwestern middle school, ages ranging from 11 to 13 years old. The data presented are from the first two years of a five-year longitudinal study that began January of 1999. Initial results indicate differences between bullies, victims, bully-victims, and students without bully/victim problems (no status) in terms of depression and anxiety. Specifically, bully-victims and bullies were more likely to be depressed than victims and no status students. Bully-victims and victims were more likely to experience anxious symptoms than bullies and no status students. Thus, an interesting pattern emerged with respect to internalizing psychopathology along the bully/victim continuum. Bully-victims may be the most impaired subtype with respect to depression and anxiety. Implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBullying Behavior
Subtitle of host publicationCurrent Issues, Research, and Interventions
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages95-122
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781317994503
ISBN (Print)9780789014368
StatePublished - Oct 18 2013

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Bullying
  • Depression
  • Early adolescence
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

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