Putting evidence into practice: An update of evidence-based interventions for cancer-related fatigue during and following treatment

Sandra A. Mitchell, Amy J. Hoffman, Jane C. Clark, Regina M. Degennaro, Patricia Poirier, Carolene B. Robinson, Breanna L. Weisbrod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has deleterious effects on physical, social, cognitive, and vocational functioning, and causes emotional and spiritual distress for patients and their families; however, it remains under-recognized and undertreated. This article critically reviews and integrates the available empirical evidence supporting the efficacy of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment approaches to CRF, highlighting new evidence since 2007 and 2009 Putting Evidence Into Practice publications. Interventions that are recommended for practice or likely to be effective in improving fatigue outcomes include exercise; screening for treatable risk factors; management of concurrent symptoms; yoga; structured rehabilitation; Wisconsin ginseng; cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia, pain, and depression; mindfulness-based stress reduction; and psychoeducational interventions such as anticipatory guidance, psychosocial support, and energy conservation and activity management. This information can be applied to improve the management of CRF, inform health policy and program development, shape the design of clinical trials of new therapies for CRF, and drive basic and translational research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-58
Number of pages21
JournalClinical journal of oncology nursing
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cancer-related fatigue
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Management
  • Nursing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Putting evidence into practice: An update of evidence-based interventions for cancer-related fatigue during and following treatment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this