Rapid increase in prevalence of carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and emergence of colistin resistance gene mcr-1 in CRE in a hospital in Henan, China

Yi Li, Qiao Ling Sun, Yingbo Shen, Yangjunna Zhang, Jun Wen Yang, Ling Bin Shu, Hong Wei Zhou, Yang Wang, Bing Wang, Rong Zhang, Shaolin Wang, Zhangqi Shenc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The global spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) is one of the most severe threats to human health in a clinical setting. The recent emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 among CRE strains greatly compromises the use of colistin as a last resort for the treatment of infections caused by CRE. This study aimed to understand the current epidemiological trends and characteristics of CRE from a large hospital in Henan, the most populous province in China. From 2014 to 2016, a total of 7,249 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were collected from clinical samples, among which 18.1% (1,311/7,249) were carbapenem resistant. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli were the two most common CRE species, with Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) and New Delhi metallo-lactamases (NDM), respectively, responsible for the carbapenem resistance of the two species. Notably, 57.0% (n 589) of the K. pneumoniae isolates from the intensive care unit were carbapenem resistant. Furthermore, blaNDM-5 and mcr-1 were found to coexist in one E. coli isolate, which exhibited resistance to almost all tested antibiotics. Overall, we observed a significant increase in the prevalence of CRE isolates during the study period and suggest that carbapenems may no longer be considered to be an effective treatment for infections caused by K. pneumoniae in the studied hospital.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01932
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • Escherichia coli
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae
  • carbapenem resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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