Rate of torque development as a discriminator of playing level in collegiate female soccer players

Ty B. Palmer, Kazuma Akehi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque and rate of torque development (RTD) variables to distinguish starters from non-starters in collegiate female soccer players. Methods: Eleven starters (20±2 years) and 13 non-starters (19±1 years) performed three isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors and flexors. Peak torque, peak RTD, and RTD at 0-100 (RTD100) and 0-200 (RTD200) ms were obtained from each contraction. Results: The starters produced significantly greater (P=0.002-0.015) knee extension and flexion peak RTD, RTD100, and RTD200 values than the non-starters. There were no significant differences (P>0.050) between the starters and non-starters for peak torque. Discriminant analysis revealed thresholds of 9.36, 7.98, and 6.97 Nm.s-1.kg-1 for knee extension RTD200 and knee flexion peak RTD and RTD100, respectively. These thresholds showed 81.8% sensitivity and 76.9 to 92.3% specificity for identifying playing group membership. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that RTD may be a better parameter than peak torque at differentiating between playing level in collegiate female soccer players. The discriminant analysis thresholds for the RTD variables demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity, and therefore, may be used as indices to identify players with a high degree of soccer playing ability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-335
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions
Volume22
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2022

Keywords

  • Contraction
  • Extension
  • Flexion
  • Isometric
  • Talent Identification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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