Relationship among adolescent reports of social anxiety, anxiety, and depressive symptoms

Heidi M. Inderbitzen, Debra A. Hope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examines the relationship among self-reported symptoms of social anxiety, anxiety, and depression in the context of Clark and Watson's tripartite theory of anxiety and depression for a sample of adolescents. Four hundred and twentyeight 10th-grade students completed three measures: the Social Anxiety Scale for Children-Revised, the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, and the Children's Depression Inventory. Results suggest that symptoms of social anxiety are distinct from symptoms of depression and unspecified anxiety. In addition, results indicate that in comparison to males, adolescent females report higher levels of social anxiety, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Conceptual and methodological implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-396
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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