Religious Characteristics of Physicians Who Care for Underserved Populations or Work in Religiously Oriented Practices

Jonathan Lio, Hyo Jung Tak, Yan Duan, Farhan Dadani, Basil Ali, John D. Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relation between physicians' religious characteristics and working for medically underserved populations or in religiously oriented practices. Methods Secondary data analysis of 2009-2010 national survey of 896 primary care physicians (PCPs) and 312 psychiatrists. Predictors included physicians' religious characteristics. Results Adjusted response rates among eligible physicians were 63% (896 of 1427) for PCPs and 64% (312 of 487) for psychiatrists. Overall, 41.3% of US PCPs and 53.2% of US psychiatrists reported working with medically underserved populations. A smaller percentage reported working in religiously oriented practices. Physicians who rated religion as most important in their lives were more likely to report working for medically underserved populations (52.5% most important vs 36.7% not important, P = 0.02) or report working in religiously oriented practices (23.9% most important vs 6.8% not important, P < 0.01). Conclusions Religious physicians may be serving in medically underserved areas or religiously oriented practices as a way to integrate their professional and personal identities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-515
Number of pages5
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume111
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Keywords

  • faith-based practices
  • medically underserved
  • primary care
  • psychiatry
  • religion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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