Research training of students in minority and international settings: Lessons learned from cancer epidemiology education in special populations

Amr S. Soliman, Patricia B. Mullan, Robert M. Chamberlain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article describes the development and evaluation of an NCI-sponsored short-term summer cancer research education program. The study questions examined: The feasibility of conducting a cancer education program in special populations at multiple US and international field sites for masters students; the merit and worth that students and faculty attribute to the program; and students' scholarly and cancer-related career outcomes. Developing a new curriculum, increasing the pool of mentors, utilizing and increasing the number of field sites, and program dissemination were also evaluated. Evidence of the program's success included students' completion of field experiences at multiple sites and their subsequent 70% project-related publication rate, with 79% of trainees reporting themselves as likely to pursue future cancer-related careers. Evaluation-guided future plans for the program include implementing faculty development to further enhance the program outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-269
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Keywords

  • Cancer epidemiology
  • Education
  • Lessons
  • Minority
  • Research training
  • Special populations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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