REVIEW OF DNA VACCINE APPROACHES AGAINST THE PARASITE TOXOPLASMA GONDII

Rosalie C. Warner, Ryan C. Chapman, Brianna N. Davis, Paul H. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite that affects both humans and livestock. Transmitted to humans through ingestion, it is the second-leading cause of foodborne illness-related death. Currently, there exists no approved vaccine for humans or most livestock against the parasite. DNA vaccines, a type of subunit vaccine which uses segments of the pathogen's DNA to generate immunity, have shown varying degrees of experimental efficacy against infection caused by the parasite. This review compiles DNA vaccine efforts against Toxoplasma gondii, segmenting the analysis by parasite antigen, as well as a review of concomitant adjuvant usage. No single antigenic group was consistently more effective within in vivo trials relative to others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)882-903
Number of pages22
JournalThe Journal of parasitology
Volume107
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Toxoplasma gondii
  • Adjuvants
  • Antigens
  • DNA vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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