Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in intestinal transplant recipients during the first year post-transplant

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of healthcare-associated infectious diarrhea. Risk factors for C. difficile infections (CDI) in intestinal transplant recipients (ITR) are not well-defined. The aim of our study was to assess specific risk factors for CDI in ITR. Methods: This is a 1:3 case–control study that included 29 ITR who developed CDI (cases) and 87 ITR without CDI (controls) observed during the first year post-transplantation. Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare variables. Univariate and multivariable conditional logistic regressions analysis were performed to identify risk factors for CDI. Results: The multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis showed that proton pump inhibitors (PPI) administration (odds ratio [OR] = 0.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.007-0.52; P =.01) was the only factor associated with lower rates of CDI. Outcomes for cases vs controls: rejection episodes 24.14% vs 20.69% (P =.7), graft loss 0% vs 2.3% (P =.99), and survival rate 1 year post-transplantation 79.3% (59.6-90.1%) vs 87.2% (78.1-92.7%) (P =.38). Conclusions: Proton pump inhibitor administration might be protective for CDI in ITR. Risks factors for CDI might be different in ITR compared to other populations; anatomical differences and medications administered in the post-transplantation period may affect intestinal microbiota.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12858
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • diarrhea
  • enteritis
  • intestinal transplant
  • risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Transplantation

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