Risk for marijuana-related problems among college students: An application of zero-inflated negative binomial regression

Jeffrey S. Simons, Dan J. Neal, Raluca M. Gaher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Method: This study examined the association between marijuana-related problems and social norms, impulsivity, and perceived use utility among 292 college students. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to simultaneously predict expected nonusers as well as predict counts of reported marijuana-related problems among expected users. Gender, social norms, impulsivity, and perceived use utility were used to predict expected nonusers as well as number of marijuana-related problems among expected users. Results: Only social norms were associated with the prediction of zero-values. In contrast, only perceived use utility was associated with the prediction of number of marijuana-related problems. Conclusions: Results generally are consistent with theories of the differential association of social-environmental and biopsychological variables with use and problems, respectively. Zero-inflated regression models are a useful strategy to examine risk behaviors with low base rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-53
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Drug abuse
  • Expected utility
  • Impulsivity
  • Marijuana
  • Social norms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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