Risky decisions and response reversal: Is there evidence of orbitofrontal cortex dysfunction in psychopathic individuals?

D. G.V. Mitchell, E. Colledge, A. Leonard, R. J.R. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

266 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigates the performance of psychopathic individuals on tasks believed to be sensitive to dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) functioning. Psychopathic and non-psychopathic individuals, as defined by the Hare psychopathy checklist revised (PCL-R) [Hare, The Hare psychopathy checklist revised, Toronto, Ontario: Multi-Health Systems, 1991] completed a gambling task [Cognition 50 (1994) 7] and the intradimensional/extradimensional (ID/ED) shift task [Nature 380 (1996) 69]. On the gambling task, psychopathic participants showed a global tendency to choose disadvantageously. Specifically, they showed an impaired ability to show learning over the course of the task. On the ID/ED task, the performance of psychopathic individuals was not significantly different from incarcerated controls on attentional set-shifting, but significant impairments were found on response reversal. These results are interpreted with reference to an OFC and amygdala dysfunction explanation of psychopathy. Crown

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2013-2022
Number of pages10
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Decision-making
  • Gambling task
  • Intradimensional/extradimensional shift
  • Response inhibition
  • Response modulation
  • Risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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