Role of adenosine in the control of inflammatory events associated with acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders

Jonathan D. Geiger, Lara Buscemi, Julie A. Fotheringham

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Throughout the body, but mainly in the periphery, adaptive and innate immune systems operate to help protect against a variety of physical and biological insults. The brain, however, is in a slightly different situation because it is encased by the skull. For many years it was thought that the brain was an organ privileged against both adaptive and immune reactions, so that adaptive immune system mediated inflammatory swelling occurs rarely, especially when and where there is an intact blood-brain barrier. The concept that the brain is immunologically privileged does not hold, however, for the innate immune system, which has been implicated increasingly in a variety of acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. The cells that mainly constitute the innate immune system in brain are phagocytic microglia, and in addition, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and neurons; all contribute to neuroinflammatory reactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdenosine Receptors
Subtitle of host publicationTherapeutic Aspects for Inflammatory and Immune Diseases
PublisherCRC Press
Pages213-236
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781420005776
ISBN (Print)0849339995, 9780849339998
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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