Role of innate lymphoid cells in allergic diseases

M. Asghar Pasha, Gargi Patel, Russell Hopp, Qi Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Over the past decade, there has been increasing interest and research into understanding the type 2 immune responses by the epithelium-derived cytokines interleukin (IL) 33, IL-25, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a unique family of effector immune cells that functionally resemble T cells but lack clonal distributed antigen receptors. Group 2 ILCs, ILC2s, are known for their capability to secrete proallergic cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-13. ILC2s are enriched at mucosal barriers in lung, gut, and skin, and their activation has been associated with a variety of allergic disorders. Objective: To study the role of ILC2 in different allergic disorders, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergies. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed for articles that reported on ILC2 in allergic disorders, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergies. Results: A review of the literature revealed an important role of ILC2 in various allergic disorders. Conclusion: Identification of ILC2s in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis indicates that these cells may represent a new therapeutic target. In this review, we discussed the current understanding of ILC2 biology and its function and regulation in various allergic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-145
Number of pages8
JournalAllergy and Asthma Proceedings
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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