Self-efficacy, problem solving, and social-environmental support are associated with diabetes self-management behaviors

Diane K. King, Russell E. Glasgow, Deborah J. Toobert, Lisa A. Strycker, Paul A. Estabrooks, Diego Osuna, Andrew J. Faber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

192 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To evaluate associations between psychosocial and social-environmental variables and diabetes self-management, and diabetes control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Baseline data from a type 2 diabetes self-management randomized trial with 463 adults having elevated BMI (M = 34.8 kg/m2) were used to investigate relations among demographic, psychosocial, and social-environmental variables; dietary, exercise, and medication-taking behaviors; and biologic outcomes. RESULTS - Self-efficacy, problem solving, and social-environmental support were independently associated with diet and exercise, increasing the variance accounted for by 23 and 19%, respectively. Only diet contributed to explained variance in BMI (β = -0.17, P = 0.0003) and self-rated health status (β = 0.25, P < 0.0001); and only medication-taking behaviors contributed to lipid ratio (total-to-HDL) (β = -0.20, P = 0.0001) and A1C (β = -0.21, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS - Interventions should focus on enhancing self-efficacy, problem solving, and social-environmental support to improve self-management of diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-753
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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