Sexual revictimization during women's first year of college: Self-blame and sexual refusal assertiveness as possible mechanisms

Jennifer Katz, Pamela May, Silvia Sörensen, Jill DelTosta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although sexual victimization during adolescence increases risk for later revictimization, mechanisms for increased risk among new college students have not been identified. Female undergraduates (N = 87) were assessed at the start and end of their first academic year. Those who reported initial sexual victimization at Time 1 were more likely than other women to report later college victimization at Time 2. Path analyses showed that self-blame and decreased sexual refusal assertiveness (SRA) explained this effect. Specifically, initial victimization was associated with increased self-blame; in turn, self-blame indirectly predicted later college victimization via decreased sexual refusal assertiveness. Prevention efforts focused on self-blame and other barriers to SRA may reduce risk for revictimization during women's transition to college.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2113-2126
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • revictimization
  • self-blame
  • sexual assertiveness
  • sexual victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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