Sexual revictimization during women's first year of college: Self-blame and sexual refusal assertiveness as possible mechanisms

Jennifer Katz, Pamela May, Silvia Sörensen, Jill DelTosta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although sexual victimization during adolescence increases risk for later revictimization, mechanisms for increased risk among new college students have not been identified. Female undergraduates (N = 87) were assessed at the start and end of their first academic year. Those who reported initial sexual victimization at Time 1 were more likely than other women to report later college victimization at Time 2. Path analyses showed that self-blame and decreased sexual refusal assertiveness (SRA) explained this effect. Specifically, initial victimization was associated with increased self-blame; in turn, self-blame indirectly predicted later college victimization via decreased sexual refusal assertiveness. Prevention efforts focused on self-blame and other barriers to SRA may reduce risk for revictimization during women's transition to college.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2113-2126
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • revictimization
  • self-blame
  • sexual assertiveness
  • sexual victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sexual revictimization during women's first year of college: Self-blame and sexual refusal assertiveness as possible mechanisms'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this