Should patients with aggressive peripheral T-cell lymphoma all be treated the same? No... well yes, ... but maybe not for long

Alison J. Moskowitz, Matthew A. Lunning, Steven M. Horwitz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The peripheral T-cell lymphomas represent about 15% to 20% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and are marked by clinical and pathologic heterogeneity. The most common T-cell entities include peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative, which account for approximately 60% of T-cell lymphoma cases. Because of the rarity of T-cell lymphomas and lack of randomized prospective studies, treatment for these diseases is not well defined. Current treatment strategies draw from data from phase II studies, retrospective analyses, and personal experience. For fit patients who can tolerate treatment with curative intent, we treat peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative similarly with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-based induction therapy followed by consolidation with autologous stem cell transplant. Given the marked differences in histology, biology, and clinical presentation for these diseases, it is likely that they should be approached differently. Furthermore, prognostic factors and degree of chemosensitivity as measured by FDG-PET (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) should likely be used to guide patients along different treatment pathways. We have a long way to go toward perfecting the treatment for T-cell lymphoma. We believe that a uniform treatment approach for patients with aggressive T-cell lymphoma is not appropriate; however, we do not yet have enough data to support an individualized approach to treatment. Clinical and biologic prognostic factors, degree of chemosensitivity as measured by FDG-PET, and histology should all likely have a role in directing patients along different treatment pathways, but prospective studies are needed to confirm this.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-449
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Journal (United States)
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • T-cell lymphoma
  • anaplastic large cell lymphoma
  • angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma
  • not otherwise specified
  • peripheral T-cell lymphoma
  • transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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