Social class and the experience of work-family conflict during the transition to adulthood.

Samantha K. Ammons, Erin L. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The challenges of juggling work and family responsibilities are well known, but there has been little attention to the distinctive work and family experiences of young adults. This chapter explores how class affects young adults' exposure to work-family conflicts and the strategies they use to manage their work and family responsibilities. Using data from a recent cohort of young adults, we find class and gender variations in work and family roles and work-family conflict. Early family formation, coupled with poor working conditions, lead those with lower educational attainments to experience more years of family-to-work interference. In contrast, young adults with more education have more work-to-family interference, and this is especially true for college-educated women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-84
Number of pages14
JournalNew directions for child and adolescent development
Issue number119
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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