Social Media: Flattening Hierarchies for Women and Black, Indigenous, People Of Color (BIPOC) to Enter the Room Where It Happens

Boghuma K. Titanji, Jacinda C. Abdul-Mutakabbir, Briana Christophers, Laura Flores, Jasmine R. Marcelin, Talia H. Swartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social media platforms are widely used to connect people across multiple settings, including country of origin, profession, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, seniority, and training. Groups that have been marginalized or historically excluded from decision-making encounters may lack formal mentors/sponsors because of a lack of representation of women and Black, Indigenous, People Of Color (BIPOC) in senior leadership positions. This can serve as a barrier to professional advancement at all stages of career development. Identifying and connecting with these potential mentors/sponsors outside of one's institutional space can be challenging. For this reason, leveraging social media to develop these professional relationships through flattened hierarchies can allow for professional networking beyond traditional mechanisms. Here we aim to describe how individuals can connect through social media to advance their careers and scientific and clinical expertise, advocate for communities, and provide high-quality communication to the public.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S222-S228
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2022

Keywords

  • Black, Indigenous, People Of Color (BIPOC)
  • flattened hierarchies
  • social media
  • women in healthcare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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