Strength Training Effects on Muscle Forces and Contributions to Whole-Body Movement in Cerebral Palsy

Amy K. Hegarty, Max J. Kurz, Wayne Stuberg, Anne K. Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Strength training is often prescribed for children with cerebral palsy (CP); however, links between strength gains and mobility are unclear. Nine children (age 14 ± 3 years; GMFCS I-III) with spastic CP completed a 6-week strength-training program. Musculoskeletal gait simulations were generated for four children to assess training effects on muscle forces and function. There were increases in isometric joint strength, but no statistical changes in fast-as-possible walking speed or endurance after training. The walking simulations revealed changes in muscle forces and contributions to body center of mass acceleration, with greater forces from the hip muscles during walking most commonly observed. A progressive strength-training program can result in isometric and dynamic strength gains in children with CP, associated with variable mobility outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-510
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Motor Behavior
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2019

Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • muscle function
  • musculoskeletal model
  • physical therapy
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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