Swim training alters renal and cardiovascular responses to stress in borderline hypertensive rats

D. E. McCoy, J. E. Steele, R. H. Cox, R. L. Wiley, G. J. McGuire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study assessed the effects of 40 min of tail shock stress (1- s shock, 0.2 mA every 30 s) on renal and cardiovascular function in swim- trained (T), water-immersed (IM), and untrained (UT) borderline hypertensive rats (BHR). T BHR swam for 2 h/day 5 days/wk for 10-12 wk, whereas IM BHR on the same schedule were placed in water at neck level and were not permitted to swim. Age-matched sedentary controls were paired one each with the exercise group (group 1) and the immersion group (group 2). Heart rate was significantly greater in UT than in T BHR (P = 0.09) during baseline (rest). Heart rate responses during stress were not different between UT and IM BHR (group 2). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures during stress and recovery were not different between UT BHR and T or IM BHR. Urine flow rate was significantly increased from baseline during the first 20 min of stress in UT and IM BHR only. Changes in glomerular filtration rate were not consistent across studies. Renal blood flow decreased significantly from baseline during tail shock stress in UT but not T BHR. Plasma glucose levels were significantly increased above baseline during the second 20 min of stress in UT BHR only and were significantly greater than those in the T BHR. Plasma insulin levels in UT BHR were significantly decreased from baseline during tail shock stress and recovery but were unchanged from baseline in T BHR. These observations suggest that swim training independent of water immersion alters the effect that stress exerts on renal and cardiovascular function in BHR, which results in better fluid and electrolyte conservation in T BHR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1946-1954
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Keywords

  • cardiovascular function
  • exercise
  • immersion
  • renal function
  • tail shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Swim training alters renal and cardiovascular responses to stress in borderline hypertensive rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this