Temporal weighting functions for interaural time and level differences. II. the effect of binaurally synchronous temporal jitter

Andrew D. Brown, Christopher Stecker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent work has demonstrated that sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITD) carried by high-rate cochlear implant pulse trains or analogous acoustic signals can be enhanced by imposing random temporal variation on the stimulus rate [see Goupell (2009). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 2511-2521]. The present study characterized the effect of such temporal jitter on normal-hearing listeners' weighting of ITD and interaural level differences (ILD) applied to brief trains of Gabor clicks (4 kHz center frequency) presented at nominal interclick intervals (ICI) of 1.25 and 2.5 ms. Lateral discrimination judgments were evaluated on the basis of the ITD or ILD carried by individual clicks in each train. Random perturbation of the ICI significantly reduced listeners' weighting of onset cues for both ITD and ILD discrimination compared to corresponding isochronous conditions, consistent with enhanced sensitivity to post-onset binaural cues in jittered stimuli, although the reduction of onset weighting was not statistically significant at 1.25 ms ICI. An additional analysis suggested greater weighting of ITD or ILD presented following lengthened versus shortened ICI, although weights for such gaps and squeezes were comparable to other post-onset weights. Results are discussed in terms of binaural information available in jittered versus isochronous stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-300
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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