The advantages of retrieval-based and spaced practice: Implications for word learning in clinical and educational contexts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Researchers in the cognitive sciences have identified several key training strategies that support good encoding and retention of target information. These strategies are retrieval-based practice, also known as learning through testing, and spaced practice. The recent resurgence of research on retrieval-based and spaced practice has been extended to investigate the effectiveness of these strategies to support learning in individuals with language disorders. The purpose of the current article is to review key principles of retrieval-based and spaced practice that can be used to support word learning in individuals within clinical and educational contexts. Conclusion: Current research provides evidence that principles of retrieval-based and spaced practice can enhance word learning for individuals with language disorders. Current research provides guidance for clinicians on how to implement these strategies both within and across sessions to support encoding and retention of target information. Additional research should be conducted to provide a better understanding of how to optimize encoding and retention in clinical and educational contexts. Most notably, research that examines long-term retention after interventions are withdrawn would further our understanding of how these principles can be optimally applied to improve outcomes for individuals with language disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-965
Number of pages11
JournalLanguage, speech, and hearing services in schools
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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