The consistency of ordinary least-squares and generalized least-squares polynomial regression on characterizing the mechanomyographic amplitude versus torque relationship

Trent J. Herda, Terry J. Housh, Joseph P. Weir, Eric D. Ryan, Pablo B. Costa, Jason M. Defreitas, Ashley A. Walter, Jeffrey R. Stout, Travis W. Beck, Joel T. Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to examine the consistency of ordinary least-squares (OLS) and generalized least-squares (GLS) polynomial regression analyses utilizing linear, quadratic and cubic models on either five or ten data points that characterize the mechanomyographic amplitude (MMG RMS) versus isometric torque relationship. The secondary purpose was to examine the consistency of OLS and GLS polynomial regression utilizing only linear and quadratic models (excluding cubic responses) on either ten or five data points. Eighteen participants (mean SD age = 24 4 yr) completed ten randomly ordered isometric step muscle actions from 5% to 95% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the right leg extensors during three separate trials. MMGRMS was recorded from the vastus lateralis during the MVCs and each submaximal muscle action. MMGRMS versus torque relationships were analyzed on a subject-by-subject basis using OLS and GLS polynomial regression. When using ten data points, only 33% and 27% of the subjects were fitted with the same model (utilizing linear, quadratic and cubic models) across all three trials for OLS and GLS, respectively. After eliminating the cubic model, there was an increase to 55% of the subjects being fitted with the same model across all trials for both OLS and GLS regression. Using only five data points (instead of ten data points), 55% of the subjects were fitted with the same model across all trials for OLS and GLS regression. Overall, OLS and GLS polynomial regression models were only able to consistently describe the torque-related patterns of response for MMGRMS in 27-55% of the subjects across three trials. Future studies should examine alternative methods for improving the consistency and reliability of the patterns of response for the MMGRMS versus isometric torque relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-128
Number of pages14
JournalPhysiological Measurement
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Physiology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

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