The dominant social paradigm, consumption, and environmental attitudes: Can macromarketing education help?

William E. Kilbourne, Les Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been argued that the dominant social paradigm (DSP) of Western industrial societies is complicit in environmental decline. In the present research, the DSP and its elements and their relation to consumption behavior are first addressed in classes on social responsibility that are taught in a business school. Two quasi-experiments are then conducted using an after-only with control group design (Study 1) and a before-after with control group design (Study 2). In both studies, attitudes of students in the social responsibility classes are compared to control groups of marketing students to determine the effects of instruction on the DSP and environmental attitudes. Findings suggest that lower scores on the DSP for the experimental group result in increased measures of environmental attitudes and perception of change necessary to ameliorate environmental degradation. However, in neither experiment does willingness to change one's own behavior materialize.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-121
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Macromarketing
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Keywords

  • Consumption
  • Dominant social paradigm
  • Education
  • Environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

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